Ofsted


The school was visited in July 2012. The following is an extract from the Ofsted report.

Key findings

This is a good school. It is not yet outstanding because teaching is not consistently good or better so progress is good rather than outstanding, and because lesson monitoring does not always focus sufficiently on pupils’ learning.

 

Children enter the Early Years Foundation Stage with skills and aptitudes a little below expectations. They leave Reception well prepared for continuing education, with a good understanding of learning routines, and attainment just above average. Effective teaching promotes good progress across Years 1 to 6. Pupils leave school with above average attainment. The inclusive nature of the school ensures consistent progress across all groups and the achievement of all pupils is good.

 

Pupils find learning enjoyable. Teaching is good and holds pupils’ interest. Teaching assistants make a significant contribution to learning in full classes and in boosting progress of small groups and individuals. Pupils’ work is carefully marked and they receive useful advice on how to improve, accompanied by helpful targets. Occasionally, teachers talk for too long, which limits opportunities for pupils to work independently and at full stretch; this slows progress.

 

Behaviour is good. Pupils have good attitudes and tremendous enthusiasm towards learning, get along with one another notably well and correctly report bullying is rare. They understand well how to stay safe.

 

The headteacher and staff work together cohesively, sharing an ambition for the school’s pupils. The curriculum is outstanding, promoting pupils’ skills, enthusiasm and engagement with learning. Perceptive use of assessment information identifies slippages in the performance of both staff and pupils and leaders act swiftly to address concerns. Leadership of teaching is largely effective but lesson monitoring is occasionally over-generous when it does not focus sufficiently on pupils' learning. Parents and carers are delighted with the school and relationships are very poitive.

 

Click here to view the entire report.

 

 

Previously the school was visited in February 2009. The following is an extract from the Ofsted report.


Overall effectiveness of the school


Pye Green Valley is a good school which has gone from strength to strength since the previous inspection, significantly improving all areas of its work. This has been achieved because of good leadership and management, particularly the inspirational leadership of the headteacher. His high expectations and caring approach have established a 'can do' culture which is warmly embraced by both pupils and staff. Parents are delighted with the improvements and are enthusiastic about the dedicated and caring staff. Many parents report that their children 'thoroughly enjoy school' and say they have come on 'in leaps and bounds'. This is a consequence of an outstanding curriculum where learning is made relevant and fun. Good care, guidance and support ensure that pupils feel very safe and secure. They are looked after well and this underpins their good academic achievement and outstanding personal development. The pupils' desire to meet the high expectations of staff is reflected in exceptional standards of behaviour and good attendance. The curriculum ensures that pupils develop an excellent understanding of healthy lifestyles.

Children get off to a good start in the Early Years Foundation Stage and continue to make good progress in Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2. When they join the Nursery class their skills are close to the expected levels for their age. By the time they reach the end of Year 6 they have achieved well and are reaching above average standards, particularly in mathematics. Pupils who are finding learning difficult, including those with learning difficulties and/or disabilities, are now identified much earlier and provided with effective support. As a result, they are making the same good progress as their peers. Achievement is good because of good teaching and learning. Most lessons are very well planned and delivered in a lively and engaging way. Occasionally, pupils sit and listen to the teacher for too long and this slows the pace of learning. The majority of teachers have good questioning skills but every now and then questions are not as probing as they might be and provide insufficient challenge. While many teachers provide helpful academic guidance through talking to pupils in lessons, the quality of teachers' marking is inconsistent. Some pupils benefit from valuable feedback but others are given limited guidance about how to improve their work. While all pupils have learning targets, their knowledge of these targets is variable and many are at the early stages of evaluating their progress towards these targets.

The reinforcement of basic skills, including reading, writing, numeracy and information and communication technology (ICT) through exciting topic work has proved extremely successful. Very interesting topics that have an immediate relevance to pupils have motivated both boys and girls to write at length and pupils are now making good progress in their writing. Pupils make an outstanding contribution to the school community, where they actively try to make life better for each other and the wider community. Topics such as 'Where have all the miners gone' have helped pupils to understand how the local area has evolved and has developed mutual understanding between older and younger members of the local community. This reflects the school's good contribution to community cohesion. The school's good capacity to improve even further is demonstrated through rising standards that have resulted from important improvements to teaching and learning and the curriculum.